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Maintain Accurate Steam and Water Sampling in Your Hydrocarbon Plant

Posted by John Powalisz on 1/6/20 8:07 AM

The full version of this information can be found in the January 2020 of Hydrocarbon Engineering.

A well-designed steam and water sampling system can give you the critical insights you need to monitor steam and condensate quality, cycle chemistry (power production) and identify potential problems in your Hydrocarbon plant.

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Topics: Power, Hydrocarbon Processing, Steam & Water

How Cycle Chemistry Helps Protect Your Passive Layer

Posted by Doug Hubbard on 12/16/19 8:18 AM

The passive layer protects hydrocarbon and power plant equipment from corrosion and all the devastating effects that corrosion can cause. Cycle chemistry is critical to maintaining and protecting your passive layer – and your equipment.

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Topics: Power, Hydrocarbon Processing, Steam & Water

Maintenance 101: Developing a Reliable Hydrocarbon Sampling Program

Posted by Randy Cruse on 12/2/19 8:00 AM

Developing a reliable hydrocarbon sampling program doesn’t end with implementation. It requires a maintenance service program that will keep your equipment running properly to ensure operator safety and equipment performance. But it can be overwhelming to establish a hydrocarbon service program. Get started with these 5 steps.

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Topics: Hydrocarbon Processing, Liquid & Slurry, Gas

Where Should You Be Sampling in Your Hydrocarbon Processing Plant?

Posted by Rod Lunceford on 11/11/19 8:00 AM

In a hydrocarbon processing plant, crude oil must be processed into more refined products. Establishing a sampling program for all types of refining processes in hydrocarbon processing plants requires special considerations for successful and safe operations.

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Topics: Hydrocarbon Processing, Liquid & Slurry, Gas

Repair vs. Replace: Managing Your Hydrocarbon Plant's Sampling Equipment

Posted by Randy Cruse on 8/26/19 8:00 AM

Many industrial plants in the United States were built decades ago and were not expected to still be in operation. Yet many are still running today, well past their expected life span. Within these plants, hydrocarbon sampling systems and equipment are often overlooked, even as new technology and regulations demand more from them.

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Topics: Power, Hydrocarbon Processing, Solids & Powder, Liquid & Slurry, Gas

The Unexpected Costs - and Clear Benefits - of Clean Fuels

Posted by Rod Lunceford on 8/12/19 8:00 AM

Globally, there’s a trend for increased policies and regulations around producing low-sulfur and ultra-low-sulfur (ULS) transportation fuels. These are often referred to as “clean fuels”.  Clean” transportation fuels typically focus on removing sulfur oxides (SOx), specifically sulfur dioxide (SO2), and mitigating pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide, hydrocarbons and particulates, from vehicles’ exhaust. Sulfur oxides can cause respiratory problems and lung damage in humans and environmental issues such as tree, plant and stone damage; acid rain and hazy air. The less sulfur content in fuel, the less polluting SOx emissions that fuel will release.

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Topics: Hydrocarbon Processing, Liquid & Slurry

Manual vs. Automatic: Which Sampling is Best for Your Hydrocarbon Processing Plant?

Posted by Rod Lunceford on 5/20/19 8:00 AM

With fluctuating demand in your Hydrocarbon Processing, how can you be sure that unit responsibilities aren't creating silos? Answer: Manual or Automatic Hydrocarbon Sampling.

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Topics: Hydrocarbon Processing, Upstream & Midstream, Solids & Powder, Liquid & Slurry

Improve Hydrocarbon Process Sampling Accuracy without Breaking the Bank

Posted by Randy Cruse on 5/6/19 8:00 AM

Accurate fiscal calculations, allocations and loss control are essential for a healthy hydrocarbon processing operation. It is also why you need to pay close attention to your sampling program. Sampling downstream and hydrocarbon-related liquids and gases such as crude oil, condensates, and oil and water mixtures means that it is critical to ensure quality control by determining product properties and composition that can directly affect your operations.

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Topics: Hydrocarbon Processing, Solids & Powder, Liquid & Slurry

Cool it Down with Sample Coolers

Posted by Kevin Kirst on 3/25/19 8:00 AM

Plants and facilities of all kinds use sample coolers to cool a sample from a process stream. Cooling samples as part of your steam and water sampling system is essential to maintaining safety and the representativeness of the sample.

For example, if a sample in a power plant is too hot to handle, the operator might throttle the flow to unacceptably low levels, which means the sample is no longer representative or acceptable.

Another example comes from Hydrocarbon processing or Process Analytics. Cooling the process to handle the sample is necessary.   If you take a grab sample of a certain hydrocarbon whether it be of a liquid or a gas, the safest way is to handle the sample at below 140F.  This protects the operator when handling hot samples that need to be physically taken to the lab safely for analysis.   

In order to achieve accurate data, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), ASTM and ASME recommend cooling water samples to 77°F (25°C) to ensure consistent, accurate test results. 

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Topics: Power, Hydrocarbon Processing, Upstream & Midstream, Liquid & Slurry, Steam & Water

Watch this Webcast to Ensure Safe, Consistent Sampling in Your Hydrocarbon Processing Plant

Posted by Rod Lunceford on 11/28/18 10:30 AM

How do I sample gas or liquid streams where there is no standard sampling point available?

At high-temperature, high-viscosity fluid sampling points, does the fluid need to be cooled before sampling?

What are the best practices for sampling foamy hydrocarbon liquids?

If you’ve ever asked these questions – or any others about manual process sampling in a hydrocarbon processing plant – the “Five Things to Know When Sampling in a Hydrocarbon Processing Plant” webcast is for you.

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Topics: Hydrocarbon Processing